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September 14th Climate Emergency Town Hall a Great Success!

There was Standing Room Only at the

September 14th Climate Emergency Town Hall!

The Climate Emergency: Montgomery County Responds Town Hall that DTMG helped organize was a resounding success! More than 320 people came to hear climate advocates explain why Montgomery County Resolution 18-974 to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in the county by 80% by 2027 and 100% by 2035 is so important, to hear from county officials what plans are in the works to achieve those goals, and to browse information tables set up by 32 local environment groups.

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Climate Scientist Danielle Meitiv opened the Town Hall with a stark overview of the urgency of global warming and a reminder that although the science is clear, “science is not enough” – we will all need to change our behaviors if we want to save the planet for our children and grandchildren.

Moderator Jacob Fenston, WAMU environment Reporter, and climate advocates Wendy Howard (One Montgomery Green), Bill Ragen (Labor Network for Sustainability), and Naeem Alam (Sunrise Movement) talked about the need for broad outreach to and engagement of communities of color, labor, and young people, and the challenges of ensuring equity and climate justice in implementing GHG reduction plans.

Moderator Jacob Fenston, WAMU environment Reporter, and climate advocates Wendy Howard (One Montgomery Green), Bill Ragen (Labor Network for Sustainability), and Naeem Alam (Sunrise Movement) talked about the need for broad outreach to and engagement of communities of color, labor, and young people, and the challenges of ensuring equity and climate justice in implementing GHG reduction plans.

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County officials Natali Fani-Gonzales (County Planning Board), Tom Hucker (County Council), March Elrich (County Executive), and Ariana Hochberg (County Climate Coordinator) talked about the Working Groups that have been established to prioritize actions the county can take to reduce GHG emissions from buildings, transportation, and generation of electricity. They also discussed the challenges that will need to be overcome, and implored attendees to engage friends and neighbors to create “a movement” across the county to push for the changes needed to shift the county to clean renewable energy, green buildings, more electric cars, and clean mass transit.

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Attendees had many questions about what the county is doing, and showed frustration at the slow pace of progress in the past 2 years in implementing policies to achieve the GHG reduction goals.

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Attendees got lots of information from 32 exhibitors in the lobby!

Here are several things you can do now to help reduce GHG emissions by 80% by 2027:

  • Contact your County Council Rep to urge support and funding for GHG reduction initiatives and programs

  • Switch your home power source(s) to clean renewables, like solar or wind

  • Compost, reduce food waste and/or eat less meat

  • Drive less, use mass transit more

  • Sign up for a home energy audit

  • Be part of the movement! Spread the word to your family, friends, co-workers, and neighbors about the climate emergency and why reducing GHG emissions is so important

You can also follow the county’s progress on the Montgomery County Climate Action Home Page, which has links to the Climate Action Planning Working Groups and the calendar of meetings, as well as the County Greenhouse Gas Inventory and Climate Resources.

Missed the Town Hall?? Lucky for you we have photos by Ed Kimmel and video from Scott Webber!!